3 Things You Need To Know About Financial Statements

Knowing how to work with the numbers in a company’s financial statements furnished by your Melbourne Accountant is an essential skill for stock investors. The meaningful interpretation and analysis of balance sheets, income statements and cash flow statements to discern a company’s investment qualities is the basis for smart investment choices.

However, the diversity of financial reporting requires that we first become familiar with certain general financial statement characteristics before focusing on individual corporate financials. In this article, we’ll show you what the financial statements have to offer and how to use them to your advantage.

Financial Statements Are Scorecards

There are millions of individual investors worldwide, and while a large percentage of these investors have chosen mutual funds as the vehicle of choice for their investing activities, a very large percentage of individual investors are also investing directly in stocks. Prudent investing practices dictate that we seek out quality companies with strong balance sheets, solid earnings and positive cash flows.

Whether you’re a do-it-yourself or rely on guidance from an investment professional, learning certain fundamental financial statement analysis skills can be very useful – it’s certainly not just for the experts.

What Financial Statements to Use

For investment analysis purposes, the financial statements that are used are the balance sheet, the income statement and the cash flow statement. The statements of shareholders’ equity and retained earnings, which are seldom presented, contain nice-to-know, but not critical, information, and are not used by financial analysts.

A word of caution: there are those in the general investing public who tend to focus on just the income statement and the balance sheet, thereby relegating cash flow considerations to somewhat of a secondary status. That’s a mistake; for now, simply make a permanent mental note that the cash flow statement contains critically important analytical data

Knowing What’s Behind the Numbers

The numbers in a company’s financials reflect real world events. These numbers and the financial ratios/indicators that are derived from them for investment analysis are easier to understand if you can visualize the underlying realities of this essentially quantitative information. For example, before you start crunching numbers, have an understanding of what the company does, its products and/or services, and the industry in which it operates.



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